Type of Position:
PhD Candidate
Place:
Saarbrücken

The Biophysics of the Cytoskeleton research group is looking for a talented and motivated doctoral candidate interested in using cell biological, biophysical and biochemical approaches in combination with microfabrication / microfluidics to study the basic principles that govern the properties of the microtubule cytoskeleton. The goal of this project is to reveal the biophysical rules that determine the relation between microtubule network architecture, dynamics and function. The project will involve live cell experiments as well as reconstituting in vitro systems with a minimum set of components(Schaedel et al., Nature Materials 2015; Aumeier et al., Nature Cell Biology 2016; Schaedel et al., Nature Physics 2019).

We are a young, enthusiastic and highly interdisciplinary team working on the cytoskeleton on different scales, from molecules to cells. We are particularly passionate about microtubules and intermediate filaments, two cytoskeletal fibers with opposing mechanical, dynamic and structural properties. We investigate cytoskeletal architecture, dynamics, mechanics and cross-talk using tools from biophysics, biochemistry, cell biology and microfabrication. For more information on the research group, please refer to www.biocytolab.com.

 

What we can offer you:

 

A flexible work schedule allowing you to balance work and family

 

A broad range of further education and professional development programmes

 

An occupational health management model with numerous attractive options, such as our university sports programme

 

Supplementary pension scheme (RZVK)

 

Discounted tickets on local public transport services (‘Jobticket‘)

 

More informations can be found here and here.

 

Type of Position:
PhD Candidate
Place:
Saarbrücken

The Biophysics of the Cytoskeleton research group is looking for a talented and motivated doctoral candidate interested in investigating cytoskeletal cross-talk. Microtubules and intermediate filaments are cytoskeletal elements with contrasting mechanical, dynamic and structural properties. We believe that cells take advantage of and differentially regulate the cross-talk between these filaments to fine-tune cytoskeletal function. The goal of the project is to unravel the rules of interaction between microtubules and intermediate filaments. To achieve this goal, we will use live cell observations as well as experiments involving cell-free extract in combination with microstructured environments and microfluidics(Schaedel et al., Nature Materials 2015; Aumeieret al., Nature Cell Biology 2016; Schaedel et al., bioRxiv 2020).

We are a young, enthusiastic and highly interdisciplinary team working on the cytoskeleton on different scales, from molecules to cells. We are particularly passionate about microtubules and intermediate filaments, two cytoskeletal fibers with opposing properties. We investigate cytoskeletal architecture, dynamics, mechanics and cross-talk using tools from biophysics, biochemistry, cell biology and microfabrication. For more information onthe research group, please refer to www.biocytolab.com

 

What we can offer you:

A flexible work schedule allowing you to balance work and family

A broad range of further education and professional development programmes

An occupational health management model with numerous attractive options, such as our university sports programme

Supplementary pension scheme (RZVK)

Discounted tickets on local public transport services (‘Jobticket‘)

More informations can be found here and here.

 

Type of Position:
PhD Candidate
Place:
Saarbrücken

Microfluidic Platform to Study Single SNARE Mediated Membrane Fusion Event

Cell communication usually involves the production of vesicles from a cell membrane, the transport of these vesicles and finally, their fusion with the target cell membrane. SNAREs are a family of proteins discovered in the late 1980s whose main physiological function is to mediate vesicle fusion. Since then, and because of their ubiquitous action, SNARE mediated vesicle fusion has been under constant and thorough investigation. Despite these enormous efforts, kinetic measurements of the ionic transport during a single vesicle fusion event are still difficult to obtain. Many model systems were developed for this purpose, but all of these model systems suffer from several drawbacks which question their bio-relevance.

 

To overcome these issues, we developed a microfluidic platform in which suspended fluid phospholipid bilayer can be generated at a defined place and the fusion of individual vesicles with this model membrane can be monitored with excellent optical and electrical access. This platform further enables exploring ion transport across membranes and fluidity of membranes. Using this microfluidic platform, different aspects of the SNARE mediated fusion dynamics and bilayer properties shall be explored. After an initial period to become familiar with the field, the candidate is expected to design and to perform experiments to study membrane fusion properties. These studies involve fluid manipulation (microfluidics), optical (florescence) microscopy, electrophysiological measurement (patch clamp), force measurements (with optical tweezer), protein expression and purification.

 

The project is part of the collaborative research center SFB-1027 from the German Science Foundation located at the Saarland University (Physical modeling of non-equilibrium processes in biological systems). Experiments will also be performed in close collaboration with the group of Frederic Pincet (ENS-Paris) and with other groups involved into the  networks.

More informations can be found here.




 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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